Health

Monday, May 25, 2020 10:00 pm

Nationwide,

More than just a picture-perfect postcard of iconic stone statues, Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, is a microcosm of a planet in flux. Directed by native Rapa Nui filmmaker Sergio Mata’u Rapu, Eating Up Easter explores the challenges his people are facing, and the intergenerational fight to preserve their culture and a beloved environment against a backdrop of a modernizing society and a booming tourism trade.

Saturday, May 16, 2020 6:00 pm

This screening is part of the 2019-2020 Dismantling White Supremacy Film Series sponsored by the Social Justice Action Committee of First Church in Jamaica Plain Unitarian Universalist and several allies. Proceeds will benefit the film's producers, the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute, and the Mass Redistribution Fund.

Tickets must be secured in advance using the link on this page. Those registering will be sent an email with the Zoom link in advance of the screening. A panel discussion will follow the screening. We encourage generous donations to support under-resourced folks in the greater Boston area, however no one will be turned away based upon ability to pay.

ABOUT THE FILM
In her signature serious-yet-quirky connect-the-dots style, Peabody award-winning filmmaker Judith Helfand takes audiences from the deadly 1995 Chicago heat disaster deep into one of our nation’s biggest growth industries – Disaster Preparedness. Along the ways she forges inextricable links between extreme weather, extreme disparity and the politics of ‘disaster’, daring to ask: what is zip code was just a routing number, and not a life-or-death sentence?

Wednesday, May 6, 2020 6:00 pm

Situated at the intersection of climate justice and the long-term struggle to dismantle structural racism, COOKED: Survival by Zip Code is a searing, yet quirky, investigation into the “natural” disasters we’re willing to see and prepare for and the unnatural ones we’re not.

Inspired by the ground-breaking book "Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago" by Eric Klinenberg, Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Judith Helfand uses her signature connect-the-dots style to take audiences from the deadly 1995 Chicago heat wave--in which 739 mostly black, elderly, and poor Chicagoans died during the course of one week--deep into one of our nation’s biggest growth industries: disaster preparedness. Along the way, Helfand forges inextricable links between extreme weather, extreme disparity, and extreme racism, daring to ask: what if a zip code was just a routing number and not a life-or-death sentence?

This is an Indie Lens Pop-Up OVEE Screening hosted by Arkansas Peace and Justice Memorial Movement and Arkansas PBS, in conjunction with Independent Lens, ITVS, Just Communities of Arkansas, and the Arkansas Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival.

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series

The Shelter-in-Place Virtual Film Series is a joint project of Arkansas PBS (ArPBS), Just Communities of Arkansas (JCA), Arkansas Cinema Society (ACS), Washitaw Foothills Youth Media Arts & Literacy Collective (WFYMALC), Arkansas Minority Film & Arts Association (AMFAA), and Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM). It is a weekly series of curated inspirational documentary films with panelists. SCHEDULE April 19: True Conviction (moderated by APJMM) April 26: (moderated by AMFAA) May 3: For Sama (moderated by ACS) May 10: I Am A Girl (moderated by JCA) May 17: Music in Arkansas: Origins (moderated by ArPBS) May 24: College Behind Bars (moderated by WFYMALC)

Monday, July 13, 2020 10:00 pm

In July 1995, a scorching three-day stretch caught the city unprepared, leaving 739 dead. Most victims were Black, elderly and poor living in the city’s poorest neighborhoods: Englewood, Fuller Park, and Roseland, to name a few. For reasons ranging from illness and immobility to poverty and fear, none were prepared for a weather event of such magnitude. COOKED: Survival By Zip Code investigates how one of Chicago’s worst disasters unfolded. On the 25th annversary of the 1995 Chicago heat wave, PBS will air an encore broadcast of COOKED as a look back at what happened and why. 

Check your local listings. 

Monday, April 20, 2020 5:00 pm

In honor or Earth Week, #StayHomeWatchTogether, a global initiative to bring groundbreaking, documentaries to online audiences this April, will host a virtual screening of COOKED: Survival By Zip Code, followed by a panel discussion and audience Q&A with Director Judith Helfand and Danielle Perry, Executive Director of Growing Home. Please join us!

RSVP here.

Friday, April 3, 2020 10:00 am

Gene Siskel Film Center
Siskel Center From Your Couch Series
https://www.siskelfilmcenter.org/cooked,

She read Eric Klineberg’s acclaimed book, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, and then Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Judith Helfand (BLUE VINYL) took a hard, personal, and often quirky look at the inequity of natural disaster, beginning with her family’s own experience of Hurricane Sandy. She ultimately zeroes in on Chicago’s shockingly inadequate response to the deadly July 1995 heatwave, during which the city morgue overflowed with the sudden deaths of 739 citizens, largely the elderly and people of color from the city’s impoverished South and West Side. This audacious look at natural disaster American-style starts with the stark premise that a zip code can be an accurate predictor of life or death when nature unleashes its worst. With increasing frequency and force, climate change sets the agenda for hurricanes, floods, heat waves, and such, but systemic neglect, deep poverty, and political expediency have already drawn the line between the survivors and the doomed, even before disaster strikes.

Stream the film here.

Thursday, March 26, 2020 7:00 pm

Virtual Screening on Zoom
Contact event organizers for online access to the film.
Post Screening Discussion on Zoom,

The Mt. Baker Meaningful Movies Venue will be hosting an online Meaningful Movies event for Cooked: Survival by Zipcode which looks at structural racism and the ways that it leads to inequitable disaster preparedness and response. The movie starts with a look at a drastic Chicago summer heat wave. This film raises important questions about how to prepare for any disaster. As we know, vulnerable people are disproportionately suffering from the economic impacts of the coronavirus so the themes of this movie are especially relevant at this time. Speaker TBD. See below for zoom log in information and for a tentative agenda.

Agenda:

7:00 - 7:10 Speaker

7:10 - 7:20 Q and A and action items

7:20 - 7:30 Small Group Discussions (Yes, this will happen via Zoom!)

7:30 - 7:40 Report back and closure

Attendees are asked to view the film prior to the beginning of the event. Contact event organizers for online access to the film.

Zoom Meeting Info for Mt. Baker MM Discussion of Cooked

Time: Mar 26, 2020 07:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting (for video conference) https://zoom.us/j/187551935

One tap mobile +16699006833,,187551935# US (San Jose)

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/aclTXPZnpE

Meeting ID: 187 551 935

 

MORE ABOUT THE MEANINGFUL MOVIES PROJECT

The Meaningful Movies Project is a non-profit organization that assists neighborhoods, groups and individuals organize, educate and advocate using the power of social justice documentary film. Screenings are followed by conversations that have the power to build positive and meaningful community. We at Meaningful Movies are here to support Meaningful Movies groups. And now, with COVID-19 and social distancing, we are digitally supporting our groups, as well as creating opportunities for filmmakers to show their films at virtual screenings. We are currently educating our volunteers about this new and exciting opportunity, as well as reaching out to filmmakers. Please email us at info@meaningfulmovies.org if you have a film you'd like to suggest to our groups that could be showed online.

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