Generation Food

With a billion hungry and two billion overweight people on Earth, everyone knows that the food system is broken. But few people understand that it’s a system, with rules that keep things ticking along. A few groups are breaking these rules of how we eat today, so that everyone can eat tomorrow. Steve James (The Interrupters, Hoop Dreams, Life Itself) and Raj Patel (Stuffed & Starved, The Value of Nothing) weave together tales of the system’s destructive creators and creative destroyers, bringing together traders, farmers, grocers and eaters from India to Malawi to Maine to Oakland to show not only how the system works, but how some unlikely people are transforming it.

Heat Map

A life and death story about extreme heat, the politics of disaster, and survival by zip code. With equal parts naivete and requisite chutzpah, Peabody Award winning filmmaker Judith Helfand sets out on a quest to see if America’s disaster preparedness industry could be used to tackle what might be the deadliest man-made disaster of all: extreme poverty. With Chicago’s 1995 heat disaster at its dramatic core -- when 739 Chicago residents, most of them poor, elderly and African American, died over the course of one hot July week -- Heat Map asks questions about the politics of disaster every city will have to answer: disaster preparedness for some or community resilience for all? Inspired by Eric Klinenberg's award winning book Heatwave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago.

To Bridge the Divide

To Bridge the Divide follows, in-depth, the stories of a dozen students, representing different races, grade levels, socioeconomic classes and educational tracks within a suburban high school grappling with how to address what is commonly (and now controversially) called a "racial achievement gap." The Kartemquin documentary series features teachers, administrators, and community policy-makers with differing perspectives. It also delves into the history and impact of the community's efforts to tackle issues of race and achievement.

Unbroken Glass

Unbroken Glass is a Kartemquin documentary about filmmaker Dinesh Sabu's journey to understand his parents, who died 20 years ago when he was six years old. Traveling to India, Lousiana, California, and New Mexico, Dinesh pieces together the story of his mother's schizophrenia and how his family dealt with it in an age and culture where mental illness was often misunderstood, scorned and taboo.